Slow Bolt Cilantro Guide

Get ready to tackle that Asian, Caribbean, or Mexican dish with this paragon of cuisine. Gently crush diced avocado, garlic, red onion, cilantro and salt to taste for a guac that won’t stop; throw some extra on top for a garnish that is sure to impress your next house guests or just your taste buds!

TO SOW

Cilantro grows best in warmer weather between 50°F-90°F. They do great in containers and gardens. Bank on Seeds recommends direct seeding.

If Direct Seeding

  • Direct seed outside 2 weeks after last frost date; or
  • Direct seed into a container 12 inches deep and wide anytime of the year. It can be placed outside when the temperature is between 50°F-90°F; or

If Transplanting

Start the cilantro seeds indoors two weeks before the last frost date in biodegradable pods that will let the roots grow; germination is best between 55°F-70°F. It can be transplanted outside 3 weeks later.

Sow seeds ½ inch deep and 2 inches apart with rows spaced 12-15 inches apart. Germination will take 8-14 days.

*When transplanting, be careful not to damage the taproot.

TO GROW

Slow bolt cilantro likes well-draining soil with lots of organic matter and aged compost. They also love full sun but can tolerate partial shade. Water thoroughly to keep the soil evenly moist and do not let the soil dry between watering. Check the top 2-3inches of soil and if dry, then water the cilantro.

Mulch can be added to retain moisture and deter weeds – they do not usually need fertilizer.

TO REAP

Cilantro is full grown (mature) in 50 days. Once the cilantro is at least 6-8 inches tall, use scissors to snip off the top 3-4 inches to use as needed. Cutting moderately will encourage continued growth of the leaves.

PESTS/DISEASES

Nematodes – plant marigold nearby

Anthracnose, leaf spot – spray with fungicide or compost tea (natural fungicide), neem oil

* Plant cilantro with chives, eggplant, anise, and tomatoes. Avoid planting with fennel. *